Elvis in the Army

May 13, 2014

At the age of 18, like all young American men of the time, Elvis was required to register for the U.S. Selective Service System.  He would go on to finish high school and begin what would soon become his illustrious career as an entertainer before he was eventually chosen for active duty in January, 1957.

After training at Fort Hood, Texas, Elvis was assigned to the 3rd Armored Division in Friedberg, Germany.  Despite offers to transfer to Special Services and live in priority housing, Elvis chose to serve as a regular soldier.  This was a smart move as it earned the respect of his fellow soldiers and opened his music up to audiences back home that once viewed him in a negative light.

Elvis' two years of service would also prove pivotal in other ways.  During this time, his mother, Gladys, would die of a heart attack brought on by Hepatitis; he would meet future wife Priscilla; and he would become dependant on stimulants and barbiturates that would eventually lead to other drugs, and his death at age 42. 

Elvis is sworn in at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, in March, 1958

Elvis with his parents, Gladys and Vernon Presley. 

 

 

 




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